The Essential YALC 2018 Guide

Here you can find out about early copies, proof giveaways, swag and fun activities at each publisher stall at YALC — you can find more information about signings, panels and workshops on their website. Keep checking back before YALC starts on Friday as there are still publishers we are waiting to hear from, or follow me on Twitter to find out when I’ve updated it.

This list was created thanks to help from Jenn at Jenniely and Lydia at Silver Wolf Reads, whose blogs this list is cross posted on. Special thanks to Jim from YA Yeah Yeah who made last year’s guide and was happy for us to go off to make this one.

For official YALC info, you can find the daily schedules here: Friday // Saturday // Sunday.

Want to add anything to this list? Email me at hux.sewmanybooks@gmail.com or DM me on Twitter.

Early Copies

Please bring enough cash for books at publisher stalls as they often do not have card machines — Orion, Harper360, HQ, BKMRK, Bloomsbury, Faber & Faber, My Kinda Book and Abram & Chronicle have confirmed they will have a card reader. Ink Road, Usborne, Scholastic, Atom Books, Andersen Press and Walker Books have confirmed they are cash only. Be aware that internet signal in YALC is unreliable, so card readers at individual publishers stalls may fail. It is recommended that you get cash out before you come to the show, as cash machines have long queues. There are several in the small shopping centre at Hammersmith Piccadilly and District line tube station (by the McDonald’s) and at the station at Kensington High Street.

What Girls Are Made Of by Elana K Arnold. Andersen Press stall.

Show Stealer by Hayley Barker (sequel to Show Stopper). Waterstones stall.

The Island by M. A. Bennett (sequel to STAGS). Hot Key Books stall.

Are We All Lemmings and Snowflakes by Holly Bourne. Waterstones stall. Take proof of purchase to Usborne stall to get some goodies, or you can email proof of receipt to kindness@usborne.co.uk.

Dark Queen by Josephine Boyce. Stall A6, labelled “Josephine Boyce” on YALC map, but is actually a stall of multiple indie YA authors. Go say hi!

The Lost Witch by Melvin Burgess. Waterstones stall. Bring your proof of purchase to Andersen press to claim a free copy of Junk, Doing It or Bloodtide.

Vox by Christina Dalcher. Harper Collins stall. Early exclusive hardbacks.

Small Spaces by Sarah Epstein. Walker stall.

The Secret Deep by Lindsay Galvin. Chicken House Books stall.

Bright Ruin by Vic James (third book in Dark Gifts trilogy, released day before). My Kinda Books and Waterstones.

Jinxed by Amy McCulloch. Hashtag Reads stall.

Giant Days by Non Pratt. Waterstones stall. Exclusive reusable coffee cup from the Abrams & Chronicle stall with receipt showing purchase.

Colour Me In by Lydia Ruffles. Waterstones stall.

Friendship Fails of Emma Nash by Chloe Seager. Waterstones.

My (Secret) YouTube Life by Charlotte Seager. My Kinda Book stall.

The Hurting by Lucy van Smit. Chicken House.

Price Guide to the Occult by Leslye Walton. Walker stall.

Only Love Can Break Your Heart by Katherine Webber. Waterstones stall.

It Ends With You by S. K. Wright. Atom Books stall.

Special editions

The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken (signed copy, film edition). BKMRK.

New Special Edition of The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. Walker stall.

Signed copies of The Extinction Trials and The Extinction Trials Exile by S. M. Wilson. Usborne. On general sale and there are competitions to win them.

Proof & Finished Copy Giveaways

In light of the accessibility issues raised in proof giveaways last year, it appears that most publishers are doing raffles for proofs. We will add any specific tasks alongside the proof information as we receive it, though you may need to ask at the stall for this information where not noted below. Remember, there are often a limited amount of proofs so consider only turning up for copies you really want.

What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli and Adam Silvera. 10 copies per day will be given away to people who have purchased a book from the Hashtag Read’s stall, chosen at random.

Damsel by Elana K. Arnold. Harper Collins stall at 11.30am on Friday. This will be operated through raffle, get there on time.

Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake. My Kinda Book100 copies available on Friday at 11am.

The Caged Queen by Kirsten Ciccarelli (sequel to The Last Namsara). Orion stall. Giveaways on Friday.

Rosie Loves Jack by Mel Darbon. Win early finished copies at the Usborne stall. 25 to give away. Winners announced 5pm each day, on Saturday by Mel Darbon herself.

Izzy and Tristan by Shannon Dunlap. BKMRK. Saturday, giveaways between 11-12 and 3-4pm.

The Witch of Willow Hall by Hester Fox. Harper Collins. 4.30pm on Saturday.

The Familiars by Stacey Halls. Hot Key Books stall. 5 copies to win over the weekend.

The Way Past Winter by Kiran Millwood Hargrave. Chicken House stall. Win copies through their competition.

A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson. Egmont/EMT.

Pages & Co by Anna James. Harper Collins. Raffle tickets given out from 12pm on Saturday, and will close on Sunday afternoon when they will announce the winner.

Outside by Sarah Ann Juckes. Penguin Random House stall. 15 proof copies of will be dropped every hour on the Friday, via a raffle draw.

Shadow of the Fox by Julie Kagawa. Harper Collins. Sunday 11am, exclusive early bind-up giveaway.

A Curse So Dark and Lonely by Brigid Kemmerer. Bloomsbury. Simply post a picture of you using our A Curse So Dark and Lonely Snapchat filter on twitter using the hashtag #BreakTheCurse and we will pick 10 winners!

That’s Not What Happened by Kody Keplinger. BKMRK. Friday, giveaways between 11-12 and 3-4pm.

Lifel1k3 by Jay Kristoff. Harper Collins. Competition/giveaway on Friday.

The Poppy War by R. F. Kuang. Harper Collins. Competition/giveaway on Saturday.

The Chaos of Now by Erin Lange. Faber & Faber. Can be won at the stall.

Sawkill Girls by Claire LeGrand. Harper Collins at 3pm on Saturday. This will be operated through raffle, get there on time.

Easy Prey by Catherine Lo. Abrams & Chronicle. 25 copies available every day between 10-12.

Devoted by Jennifer Mathieu. BKMRK. Sunday, giveaways between 11-12 and 3-4pm.

Killer T by Robert Muchamore. Hot Key Books, available on Sunday.

No Fixed Address by Susin Nielsen. Andersen Press. Saturday and Sunday: Enter to win by joining in with our No Fixed Address quiz. Five winners will be selected at random each day.

Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan. Hodder. Proofs to be given away throughout the weekend.

The Distance Between Me and the Cherry Tree by Paola Peretti. Hot Key, be in with a chance to win by tweeting the trailer to win a copy (check the stall for timings).

Tempests and Slaughter by Tamora Pierce. Harper Collins. Competition/giveaway of the proof on Sunday.

Sisters of the Winter Wood by Rena Rossner. Atom Books. Daily giveaways.

Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon. Saturday 28th July, 2pm people in the signing queue will be given raffle tickets. Samantha will then be drawing 2 x winning raffle tickets for a proof giveaway and Bloomsbury will contact the 2 winners to come to the stand to collect their proof.

Beneath The Citadel by Destiny Soria. Abrams & Chronicle. 25 copies available every day between 3 and 5.

You Only Live Once by Jess Vallance. Hot Key Books stall. Roughly 20 copies available to giveaway. Tweet us your YOLO moment to win, six copies a day to giveaway.

The Light Between Worlds by Laura Weymouth. Chicken House. Competitions to win a copy.Emily Eternal by M. G. Wheaton. Hodder. Proofs to giveaway throughout the weekend.

The Girl King by Mimi Yu. Orion stall. Giveaways on Friday.

 

Samplers and Fun Stuff at the Stalls

Some samplers are available freely, whereas some you can win at the stalls; check at the individual stalls to confirm.

A6, Indie authors stall:

  • Free bath bombs with book purchase, limited to first 30 sales.
  • Wunderkids 2 bookmarks.

Abrams & Chronicle:

  • Samplers of Stain by A.G. Howard. Win on their stall through a lucky dip — pull a purple flower out of the box to win.
  • All books discounted by up to 25%!

Andersen Press: all paperbacks £5, hardbacks £10.

Atom Books: Samplers of Every Colour of You by Amelia Mandeville, Sisters of the Winter Wood by Rena Rossner and of a currently unannounced project.

BKMRK:

Bloomsbury:

  • Competition to win your very own Harry Potter House Common Room print signed by Levi Pinfold. Simply post a photo of yourself with your Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets House Edition with the hashtags #HarryPotter20 and #YALC on twitter or Instagram for your chance to win!
  • Friday 27th 1pm — 5pm: free Sarah J. Maas Nail Art in the communal area of YALC with two professional manicurists. Take your nail design from the book covers on offer – A Court of Frost and Starlight, A Court of Wings and Ruin, A Court of Mist and Fury or A Court of Thorns and Roses. Limited availability, sign up at the Bloomsbury stand via a sign-up sheet as soon as doors open on Friday.

Chicken House:

  • Party to celebrate the publication of The Secret Deep by Lindsay Galvin, 4pm Saturday. There are a limited number of goodie bags for people who buy a copy at this time.
  • Kiran Millwood Hargrave will be signing books from 12.30 on Saturday at the Chicken House stall.

Egmont/ Electric Monkey:

  • Samplers of A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson.
  • Holly Jackson will be available to sign proofs and samplers Friday at 11.30-12.00 and 15.30-16.00, Saturday at 10.15-10.45 and 14.30-15.00 and Sunday at 12.30-13.00 and 14.30-15.00.

Faber & Faber:

  • Samplers of The Curses (sequel to The Graces) by Laure Eve
  • Opportunity to win short story sampler Tales of Sand and Sea by Alwyn Hamilton at 2pm Saturday and Sunday followed by signing.
  • Hero at the Fall by Alwyn Hamilton tote bags and t shirts can be won at the stand
  • In Paris With You competition for a copy of the book and other goodies
  • Laure Eve will be at our stand to sign copies of The Graces on Saturday at 12pm

Firefly Press:

  • Three Strikes by Kat Ellis, Lucy Christopher and Rhian Ivory.
  • Kat Ellis will be on the stand to sign copies of Three Strikes and chat on Saturday 28 July from 12 midday.

Hashtag ReadsAmy McCulloch will be on the stall to sign copies of Jinxed on Saturday at 12.30pm

Harper Collins (one stall for Childrens, HQ, Harper Voyager & 360)

  • On Friday at 3pm, there will be a raffle based giveaway where you can win one of 50 Alice Oseman signed prints.
  • Friday at 2pm: VOX Jumper and Hardback Giveaway
  • On Saturday, there will be a Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth print giveaway
  • Charly Cox framed poem/photo giveaway on Saturday, 1.30pm.
  • Sunday: Fantastic Beasts super prize raffle
  • Samplers of The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy (sequel to Gentlemen’s Guide to Vice and Virtue) by Mackenzi Lee; Fierce Like a Firestorm (sequel to Wicked Like a Wildfire) by Lana Popović

Hodder: Running several competitions to win a mammoth book bundle, a set of Strange the Dreamer and Muse of Nightmares proofs, and a Jasper Fforde hibernation pack! Check at the stall for details.

Hot Key Books

  • Alexandra Christo will sign To Kill a Kingdom on the stall 10-11am on Saturday.
  • M. A. Bennett will sign copies of STAGS and The Island 12-1pm on Saturday.
  • To Kill a Kingdom themed siren makeovers on Saturday 10-2pm. Check the stall to book a slot.
  • Samplers for The Wicked King by Holly Black and The Twisted Tree by Rachel Burge samplers available on stand
  • Hot Key will be running the book swap stand again!

Ink Road: Samplers of Summer Bird Blue by Akemi Dawn Bowman.

Interlude Press: 

  • Author Julia Ember will be signing sneak peeks of her new book The Navigators Touch, the sequel to The Seafarer’s Kiss.
  • All books will be discounted!

My Kinda Book:

  • Friday, from 2pm a chance to win Floored Converse.
  • Saturday 12-2pm, Children of Blood and Bone inspired lip looks with MDM Flow; from 2pm Children of Blood and Bone cupcakes and discover your maji clan.
  • Sunday: from 10am, Ash Princess lucky dip.
  • Sunday: 1-3pm Vic James (Dark Gifts Trilogy) signing, followed by afternoon tea with Vic.
  • Double sided sampler of Muhammed Khan’s books, featuring I Am Thunder and their forthcoming release Kick the Moon.
  • Samplers of Enchantée by Gita Trelease.

Orion:

Penguin:

Scholastic:

  • Samplers of Oh My Gods by Alexandra Sheppard; A Storm of Ice and Stars (sequel to a Shiver of Ice and Snow) by Lisa Lueddecke.
  • Original short story in sampler format – Noah Goes Nuclear by Simon James Green!

Stripes:

  • Aisha Bushby will be singing copies of Change book from 1.30pm on Saturday.
  • #ProudBook cover reveal at 3.30pm on Saturday.
  • Sneak peek pamphlet from Proud Book will be available after the reveal.

Titan Books:

  • Samplers of The Devouring Gray by Christine Lynn Herman and Other Words for Smoke by Sarah Maria Griffin
  • Pins for A Blade So Black by L. L. McKinney

Walker: Samplers of Dry by Neal Shustermann

Usborne:

  • Friday: Kim Curran will be holding a ‘Slay your demons workshop’ and will be available to sign copies of Slay afterwards on the UsborneYA stand.
  • Sunday: Will Hill, YA Book Prize winner, will be signing copies of winning book, After the Fire, following his appearance.
  • Sunday: All attendees of Holly Bourne’s origami workshop will receive a #KindnessIScontagious goodie bag. Help Usborne spread the Kindness virus — visit the UsborneYA stand to find out more on the Sunday.
  • Free posters with sample chapters for The Extinction Trials, Slay and Are We All Lemmings and Snowflakes?
  • Paperbacks are 2 for £10, or sold at RRP.

A Night at the Theatre | Theatrical Blog Tour

To imagine my life without the theatre in it would be very difficult. I’ve been lucky enough to spend time both in the seats and on the stage. When the lovely team at Usborne asked me to write a little about my love for the theatre in order to celebrate the release of Theatrical by Maggie Harcourt, I leaped at the chance.

C1083E63-261A-456C-B4B0-304BBBF2E4F8

My earliest memories of the theatre all involve my tiny grandma, Betty Little. She would pick me up in her little red Mini, which had absolutely no suspension whatsoever, and we would head over to the Rhyl Pavillion, a theatre that literally had a waterpark known as The Sun Centre attached to it for most of my childhood (I’m always a little bit surprised that other lobbies don’t have a slight odour of chlorine). We would watch all manner of shows, with a bag of Werthers Originals between us — surreptitiously unwrapping each sweet without causing any sound was all part of the experience. I loved seeing stories unfold before me, the rush of excitement knowing that anything could happen.

Throughout primary school, I was regularly on the stage — I was Mary twice, a fox cub in Fantastic Mr Fox, the lead girl in this really strange musical that seemed to be a rip off of both Rocky Horror and Petshop of Horrors (I just played the sample of Looking for the Action, a song which has haunted my memory for 20 years), and one of the ugly sisters in Cinders, amongst others. I remember playing Mary Jones, a young Welsh girl who walked miles to get a bible from Bala, more than once; the scent of the plastic fish and bread I was supposed to mime eat so very vivid twenty years later. My childhood is punctuated by learning lines, being fitted for costumes made of impossibly shiny material, the drying sensation of the heavily painted lipstick and of Jonathan Fisher-Jones and I trying to box people in during the waltz part of Cinders, just to make it a little more fun.

WhatsApp Image 2018-07-16 at 18.39.39

My parents absolutely pegged me for a theatre kid, but as my high school had no real drama program and we couldn’t afford the local theatre school, my thespian days were over and I focussed more on my voice. Our high school put on annual summer concerts at the very same theatre I spent my childhood, in which I would usually insist on singing at least two solo pieces. I belted out I Dreamed a Dream, the intonation entirely copied from Ruthie Henshall as I’d never heard another version sung. I bounced along to the achingly sweet Walking Back to Happiness, a song I was gifted by my music teacher due to my low rich voice. I performed a definitely-too-raunchy version of Fever while wearing a plunging dress and a feather boa in my final concert, aged seventeen. And in between these performances, we ran around the backstage and its corridors, walked by so many before us. We would find hallmarks of previous visitors, consigned to history like ghosts — a rogue lipstick, a song list, a sign designating whose dressing room was whose. Those memories are some of the happiest of my teenage years, the giddy rush of performance and the camaraderie of local showbiz.

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

This year, I’ve been incredibly lucky to see some fantastic shows. My dear friend Ruth and I have made a pact to go see as much theatre in the next year or so as possible, and my musical obsessed friend Lauren has promised to show me all her favourite shows when I move to South London later this year. I howled with laughter at Verity Rushworth’s performance of History of Wrong Guys from Kinky Boots. I sobbed extensively through Hamilton, a musical that occupied every waking thought of mine in 2016. I marvelled at Laura Linney’s almost chameleonic ability to switch between the characters of Lucy Barton and her mother in the monologue adaptation of My Name is Lucy Barton. I marvelled at the dialogue and playfulness of Friel’s Translations at the National Theatre, all the time thinking of how colonialism scours the land.

Each experience so different but unforgettable to all my senses; the collective held gasp of the audience, the sooty vapour of stage smoke, the change in lighting to draw the eye. Theatre’s all-sensory nature amazes me, and even a bad play can still be an interesting night.

And this is what I think Harcourt’s novel Theatrical explores so effortlessly — not only the life behind the scenes, but that brought to the stage, the life in the seats. I was completely absorbed into Hope’s story, not only her swoony romance but her work managing the stage, which Harcourt has clearly researched extremely thoroughly.

Here’s the blurb for you:

Hope dreams of working backstage in a theatre, and she’s determined to make it without the help of her famous costume-designer mum. So when she lands an internship on a major production, she tells no one. But with a stroppy Hollywood star and his hot young understudy upstaging Hope’s focus, she’s soon struggling to keep her cool…and her secret.

Theatrical is the perfect summer novel, not only for theatre lovers, but for anyone who has ever wanted to follow their passions and dreams.

You can pick up your copy of Theatrical here:

Hive (UK) // Book Depository (International)

Why not go check out the other stops on the tour and learn about other people’s relationships with the theatre.

Theatrical blog tour (1).jpg

Thank you kindly to Stevie Hopwood for inviting me to be on the tour and for sending me a reading copy of Theatrical, and to Maggie Harcourt for writing it.

Please note that Book Depository links from this site are affiliate links.

When in London: “Have you ever scratched a pig’s back?”

A childhood in North Wales surrounded by farmland has led me to have certain assumptions about the world, which are being challenged by my partner Tim. He of middle class suburban youth has had many experiences non-typical for me, such as being Captain of his private school’s shooting team  l o l l e.

But apparently many things I experienced are not shared by him, or it turns out many people I know. These life experiences that I assumed were part of everyone who lived near a field’s childhood include scratching a pig’s back, having an innate knowledge of what a badger smells like and recognising that pregnant cows walk in a particular manner. Since this original conversation, I have also learned that knowing not to let pregnant women near sheep afterbirth is not common childhood knowledge either.

So in order to give Tim a basic understanding of what I’m referencing half the time, while I chew on my piece of hay and refuse to rise until a cockerel has crowed, I decided to take Tim to a city farm.

Look how gleeful he is.
Look how gleeful he is.

After discussions with various pals about the wealth of city farms in London, we opted for Mudchute Farm. Mudchute Farm sits on the Isle of Dogs in a lovely little haven of grassland and trees, and is free to visit (though you can become an annual member for a £10 donation that goes towards keeping the animals safe and happy, or you can sponsor one of the animals). You can take along your own carrots or buy little bags of grass pellet feed to give to all the animals, but please please do not take bread as there are many signs stating this is not good for the animals and you wouldn’t believe how many people I saw flaunting this. If you see it, call it out, and keep the lovely donkeys safe.

So back to the pig scratching quest, which was achieved! I did point out to Tim that pigs can bite and this sow was a particularly muscley babe, so the first few scratches were done with great trepidation.

20150301_124422

He also fed a donkey grass for the first time just as two little girls both under the age of six were also experiencing their first snuffly hoover of grass. Their mother and myself looked on with pride as the three of them dashed up a hill to get nice juicy grass to feed to the grey donkey.

20150301_125625

My personal favourite was an inexplicably cordoned off sheep who loved being tickled behind the ears and really leaned into it.

Screen Shot 2015-03-14 at 22.07.57Screen Shot 2015-03-14 at 22.10.35

The train station (Mudchute on DLR) is rather close by. Accessibility may be an issue for those in wheelchairs if there has been heavy rain recently, but in the dry heat of the summer there should be no problems. There is a cafe by the riding school that does a decent range of meals, and if you need a quieter area to ponder and rest, I recommend the petting zoo behind the stables where there is a snoozy ferret and some bunnies.

I really enjoyed Mudchute as a perfect haven from city life – even if you can see Canary Wharf over the hill – helping you to forget that Monday morning conference call and remembering how green the city can be. Have you been to Mudchute? If you go soon, be sure to comment and send me a picture of you with your favourite farm animal.

20150301_133045